Should you use the Android N Dev Preview 3 (Beta) on your phone and tablet?

Just because the status of the software has been upgraded doesn’t mean it’s ready for every phone or tablet. (But it is better.)

We knew plenty about Android N heading into Google I/O 2016, but most of us rightly stayed away from installing it on a main device due to its Developer Preview “alpha” status. There were bugs. It was unstable. Features were missing or broken. Even the die-hard Nexus fans had reason to stick with something more stable on their main phone or tablet.

But with the announcement that Android N is now available as a “beta” release, purportedly with daily use stability, is it time to load it up on the Nexus you carry in your pocket every day?

After using it on every compatible device ourselves, we have some definitive answers for you.

Know what you’re getting into

Even though the status of the current available build of Android N has been upgraded from a self-described “alpha” up to “beta,” it’s important to remember that even Google plans two more updates to this Developer Preview program software before its release as a final operating system that will ship on phones, tablets and Android TV boxes. As the name clearly states, this is a preview for developers to test out their apps and get used to the way the new version of Android will work, and even at this point Google says that its APIs and the SDK for building against them isn’t final (that’ll come with Preview 4).

All of that isn’t to say that you downright shouldn’t use the Android N Developer Preview, it just means that you need to temper your expectations. Yes there will be times when the software doesn’t work right, and it may have issues that you wouldn’t experience on Marshmallow; but then again, you’re getting a sneak peek at the latest and greatest from Google, and that’s worth the hassle for some.

Now, onto our experiences with the software.

On the Nexus 6P, 5X and 6

Android N on the Nexus 6P

Google’s latest phones, the Nexus 6P and Nexus 5X, work pretty darn well on the latest Android N Dev Preview release, particularly when compared to the previous Dev Preview version. Both phones are basically just as smooth as on Marshmallow, though you’re still going to run into occasional reboots and some app bugs because developers don’t have the ability to submit updated apps for the new platform. If you’re running on Project Fi you may experience some network issues if you regularly switch between networks, leading to some battery drain. (Aside from this, Project Fi is supposedly fully supported in this build.)

The Nexus 6 is starting to show its age when it runs the latest Android N Dev Preview build, but still does admirably with the new software. We’ve experienced some slowdowns switching between apps (with jagged animations to boot) and opening the camera, but for the most part the phone handles the newest Android N just as stable as its official build of Marshmallow.

We can say that enthusiast users should have few issues using the latest build on their phones, but be cautious here. Because this is likely your main device, you should think twice before putting unstable software on your Nexus 6P, 5X or 6 if you need it to run properly at all times.

On the Pixel C and Nexus 9

Android N on the Pixel C

Android N seems as solid on the Pixel C as it is on the Nexus 6P. We’ve seen occasional headaches with apps — sometimes something might crash, or built-in Chrome webviews may die. But if you want to experiment a little, we’re comfortable recommending this beta build.

The Nexus 9, on the other hand, is a bit more of a mixed bag. It wasn’t exactly speedy and smooth on Marshmallow, and the latest Android N build hasn’t improved that. Add in some extra instability and crashes with incompatible apps, and this is a cautionary tale. Taking a look at Android N on the Nexus 9 will likely add to your frustrations.

Considering that your tablet is likely more of a secondary device to your phone, we’re willing to recommend you give Android N Developer Preview 3 a try.

On the Nexus Player

Nexus Player

Android N is finally ready to run on the Nexus Player.

Earlier builds were too crashtastic for even sporadic use by a non-developer. (Raises hand.) Now we just need to wait for picture-in-picture-compatible apps to drop so we can see the new feature in action. But that won’t officially be able to happen until the ​next​ beta build — so what you’re getting here is just a look at tweaks to the main interface.

Upgrading and rolling back

If you’ve decided to give the Android N Developer Preview a try, you can enroll your compatible Nexus device to receive an OTA update to the latest release through the Android N Beta Program. Once on this track, you’ll be updated to future Developer Preview releases with OTA updates, but can unenroll your devices from the program at any time.

Remember: If you choose to unenroll, you’ll receive an update to your phone or tablet that will wipe all data from the device when it installs to head back to Marshmallow. You’ve been warned. Now, enjoy your early look at the next version of Android!

Android N Developer Preview

The Android N Developer Preview is just that — a developer preview. While it’s now “release candidate beta” quality we still have to issue a word of caution. Tread lightly.

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[Source : http://www.androidcentral.com/should-you-try-android-n-beta-your-phone-and-tablet]